2 Reasons Why Demand For Stocks Will Fall

By Path Financial President and Chief Investment Officer Raul Elizalde

today imageTwo sources of demand that contributed to driving up stock prices are going away.

Strong buying came in the last few years from the very companies who issued those stocks. Finding it cheaper to borrow money than pay dividends, they issued a large number of corporate bonds and used the proceeds to buy back significant portions of their outstanding shares.

Alongside companies buying stocks were retail investors who just wanted income, but could not find it anywhere as interest rates hovered around historical lows for years.

There are indications, however, that both reasons for buying stocks are becoming less compelling.

To begin with, there are fewer shares. This was the logical result of having interest rates at historical lows, which resulted in companies buying back stocks. This gave more fuel to an already booming stock market.

today first graph

According to the Fed, a net value of $3.1 trillion of corporate equity was retired by repurchases and mergers & acquisitions since 2011. This enormous amount is comparable to the entire GDP of Germany. The number of shares in the S&P 500 calculated by Standard & Poors shows the same trajectory as the Fed data. And the first quarter of this year set a new buyback record, even as rates rose.

But the feverish pace of repurchases may be starting to ease.

today second graph

The 2-year US Treasury rate is now above the average dividend yield of S&P 500 companies. Some companies may still be able to issue bonds at cheaper rates than their dividends, but the margins are getting thinner and fewer can still do this profitably. This may be the reason why the portion of companies retiring more than 4% of their outstanding stock fell to its lowest level since tracking started in 2014. If rates continue to climb, we believe that this portion will fall further.

Additionally, conservative retail buyers who had gravitated to stocks as the only source of income are now able to access the safety of bonds that offer higher yields. While rates are still relatively meager by historical standards, they are now at least at par with inflation. Investors who until recently had no choice other than dividend stocks to produce income may be warming up to bonds, thus reducing another source of demand for stocks.

Stocks went up for various reasons in addition to corporate buybacks and dividend-seeking retail investors, but there is no doubt that both have played an important role in driving up prices. As rates return to more normal historical levels, these two sources of demand may well evaporate. While this may not be enough to sink the market, at the very least it paves the way for higher volatility in the months ahead.

This analysis originally appeared in Raul Elizalde’s Forbes.com investment column. Click here to follow Raul on Forbes.

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Raul Elizalde President Path FinancialRaul Elizalde is the Founder, President, and Chief Investment Officer of Path Financial, LLC. He may be reached at 941.350.7904 or raul@pathfinancial.net.

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Earnings Forecasts Optimism Could Spell Trouble for Market

By Path Financial President and Chief Investment Officer Raul Elizalde

photoStock prices depend on future earnings expectations. The current consensus is for earnings per share (EPS) to grow through the end of 2019 by about 30% to record highs. These are risky forecasts: if numbers come out short, stock prices will take a hit. Can investors rely on these forecasts?

first graph

Operating earnings estimates from hundreds of analysts pooled by Standard and Poors’ Capital IQ show that optimism about earnings is strong. This is noteworthy because observers are also contemplating the possibility of a slowdown, or even a recession, in 2019.

The enthusiasm may be due in part to the strong acceleration of operating EPS growth that started in mid-2016. Remarkably, a related set of numbers – corporate profits before tax from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) – lack the same vitality. The BEA numbers, in fact, have more or less stalled since 2010, and there is little indication that they are ready to take off.

To be sure, the two sets are quite different. The S&P numbers only pertain to public companies belonging to the S&P 500, while the BEA numbers are intended to cover all corporations, public or not. Additionally, while both figures are calculated before tax, various other accounting items are treated differently.

Nevertheless, the rate of growth for both tends to move in the same direction, with peaks and troughs reached at the same time, as in 1994, 2003-04 and 2010-11. One key observation would be whether the gap between the BEA numbers and operating earnings narrows or widens at the end of the second quarter. If both measures continue to diverge, the chance that operating EPS will achieve the 2019 targets will diminish.

second graph

It is important to point out that the strong earnings growth rates of 2003-04 and 2010-11 were possible because of the low starting points caused by prior recessions. In comparison, the strong rate projected for 2019 would have to be reached after almost 10 years of expansion. It may be harder for earnings to accelerate from the current high base.

Plenty of research throws doubt on the ability of analysts to predict earnings far in advance, and this is borne by the evidence. According to Standard & Poors, only 9% of analysts were able to forecast current quarter EPS correctly in the last five years. Most forecasts exceeded the actual numbers, or came out short.

This is not surprising. Not only there are many exogenous, unpredictable factors affecting earnings, but also the accounting input needed to make forecasts is hopelessly complex. As Mike Thompson, S&P Investment Advisory chairman said on a recent TV interview, “you almost need forensics to understand some of the accounting that goes on to get to EPS.”

So is the current projection for the next seven quarters of earnings achievable? Yes, it is, but that is not saying much. Any projection is possible. One as optimistic as the current one may also need a generous serving of luck to come true.

This analysis originally appeared in Raul Elizalde’s Forbes.com investment column. Click here to follow Raul on Forbes.

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Raul Elizalde President Path FinancialRaul Elizalde is the Founder, President, and Chief Investment Officer of Path Financial, LLC. He may be reached at 941.350.7904 or raul@pathfinancial.net.

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